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about emotional, financial, social, spiritual and environments, occupational and intellectual as well as physical aspects of ourselves. we call this the eighth dimension model of wellness. this is how we conceptualize wellness. we care about physical wellness because people are physically sick and many are dying 25 years before the general population. we care about intellectual wellness because we need healthy minds and healthy bodies in the knowledge to reclaim and manage our lives in recovery. we care about social wellness because the conditions bring about social isolation, leading people further from their healthy recovery. we care about spiritual wellness because disease, all these diseases, robs us of our sense of meaning, purpose and spiritual connectedness. we care about mental and emotional wellness week as people need clear, wide lines in order to live productive lives and pursue recovery. we care about environmental wellness because it's impossible for people to feel better or well in places or spaces where there is overcrowding, stress, pollution and other toxins in both p
sure that we provide an environment where we can create good-paying jobs and keep them right here in the state of nevada. we've got work for small businesses, making sure that we pass the hire act which my opponent voted against, the small business jobs act which my opponent voted against, making sure we make nevada the clean energy jobs capital of the united states which my opponent voted against investment for renewable energy. >> moderator: thank you. our next question comes from ray hagar, and it's directed to senator heller. >> as you know, nevada's a leader in national unemployment, and in 2010 during a speech in elko, you questioned the wisdom of extending unemployment benefits. you asked, quote: is the government now creating hobos, unquote? as nevada's unemployment crisis continues, are you calling nevada's unemployed hobos? [laughter] heller: or this is the most difficult part of an election, that's proving something you didn't do or something you didn't say. and in this case, this is something i did not do and something i did not say. i did not say that. what i do want
's an understatement. but you go up and in environment, at least i was fortunately enough to where we believe that it was perfectible. you know, it's very, i think, pretty much acceptable or maybe somewhat today to be critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there were obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but it was always this unrelying -- underlying bailiff belief we were entitled -- it was the way we grew up. the nones who were immigrants who would explain it to us we were entitled as citizens of the country to be full participates. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal. it said so in the decoration of independents. there were times later on -- make remarks reciting the not so pleasant remarks and reciting the pledge of allee again or say things i think were -- not be cell phones. [laughter] people can youtube and you it's around forever. i was upset about thing. but i grew up in an environment with people around me who believed that this country could be
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3